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Invention of the 4-cycle Outboard Motor

July 11, 2017 @ 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Multimedia presentation and tour of the Stevenson Outboard Collection.

Crosley started his own radio station, employing singers including Doris Day

The story of the invention of the 4-cycle outboard motor begins in 1907 and involves five companies located across America: Crosley, Aerojet, Fageol, Homelite, and Fischer Pierce, who built everything from trucks to radios.  These companies were founded by driven, inventive entrepreneurs, and each contributed a technological advance to the development of the 4-cycle outboard. One of the most prominent entrepreneurs was Powell Crosley, Jr., who took his son to the radio store to buy a crystal radio set, and was astonished to find out the price.  He decided to go into business with his brother, Lewis, building radios on a mass production line that were cheap enough for the average person to buy. Their venture was wildly successful, causing Crosley to be dubbed “The Henry Ford of Radio.”  Crosley started his own radio station, employing singers including Doris Day, then started a car company called Crosley Motors.  In 1940, Lloyd Taylor of Taylor Engines invented a 4-cylinder, 4-cycle, overhead cam engine nick-named COBRA.   Crosley bought exclusive rights to this engine and in 1942 developed the COBRA engine into military gen sets on PT boats, assault craft and Navy pumps.

After the talk Larry Stevenson will conduct a tour of the newly opened Stevenson Outboard Collection, focusing on the outboard motors discussed in the presentation.

Admission is free, a suggested donation of $5 is appreciated.

This talk is presented by outboard motor collector and historian Larry Stevenson.  Larry is a Navy and Coast Guard Auxiliary veteran and a retired UPS International Industrial Engineering Manager in the international operation with a passion for industrial design, art, history, and sailing.

Details

Date:
July 11, 2017
Time:
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm